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Today in Health & Wellness
HEALTH CONDITIONS

Contact Lens Care

Overview
Risk Factors
Commonly Prescribed Drugs
Treatment and Management
Doctors to Consult
Overview
A contact lens, or simply contact, is a thin lens placed directly on the surface of the eye. Contact lenses are considered medical devices and can be worn to correct vision, to enhance vision or for cosmetic or therapeutic reasons.
Symptoms
Risk Factors

Contraindications using contact lenses

  • Any previous ocular injury
  • Lid infection
  • Conjunctivitis
  • Cataract
  • Glaucoma (including family history)
  • Dry eye
  • Any surgery to the eye or ocular adnexa
Commonly Prescribed Drugs

Commonly used solutions

  • Multipurpose solutions i.e. Thimerosal, edentate Na, NaCl, Na phosphate, mono and dibasic.
Treatment and Management

Personal care and management

  • Before handling contact lenses, wash your hands with soap and water, then rinse and dry them with a lint-free towel.
  • Minimize contact with water.
  • Do not rinse with or store in water.
  • Do not put into your mouth to wet them.
  • Do not use saline solution.
  • Wear and replace contact lenses according to the schedule prescribed by your eye care professional.
  • During cleaning, rub your contact lenses with your fingers, and then rinse the lenses with solution before soaking them.
  • Rinse the contact lens case with fresh solution not water. Then leave the empty case open to air dry.
  • Keep the contact lens case clean and replace it regularly, at least every three months. Lens cases can be a source of contamination and infection. Do not use cracked or damaged lens cases.
  • Do not re-use old solution or "top off" the solution in your lens case.
  • Do not transfer contact lens solution into smaller travel-size containers. This can affect the sterility of the solution, which can lead to an eye infection.
  • Do not allow the tip of the solution bottle to come in contact with any surface, and keep the bottle tightly closed when not in use.
  • If you store your lenses in the case for an extended period of time, consult the instructions for the lenses or the contact lens solution to determine if re-disinfecting the lenses is appropriate before you wear them. In no case should you wear your lenses after storage for 30 or more days without re-disinfecting.
  • Remove the contact lenses and consult an ophthalmologist immediately if you experience symptoms such as redness, pain, tearing, increased light sensitivity, blurry vision, discharge or swelling.
  • If you smoke, stop. Studies show that contact lens wearers who smoke have a higher rate of problems than nonsmokers.
  • Beware of using decorative lenses, such as those often sold at costume shops. These lenses have the potential to damage eyes permanently.
  • Get regular eye exams. If you wear contact lenses, you should be examined by an eye care provider annually, and more often as needed.
  • As with any prescription, contact lens prescriptions do expire typically within one year. You should see your eye care professional yearly to ensure they continue to have an accurate and appropriate prescription. These regular exams are also important opportunities for reinforcing proper lens care.
  • Eye care experts currently consider daily disposable lenses the safest soft contact lenses for your eyes. Talk to your eye care professional to determine which may be the best choice for you. Then follow his guidance on care.
Home Remedies
Doctors to Consult
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